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May 2021

Monday, 24 May 2021 00:00

Are Foot Fractures Common?

The foot is made up of 26 bones, so perhaps it comes as no surprise that foot fractures account for about 10% of all broken bones in the body. Foot fractures are some of the most common podiatric injuries, particularly among athletes. A broken foot bone can be especially debilitating, as the feet carry the weight of the whole body. The symptoms of a broken foot include pain, bruising, swelling, and tenderness, as well as difficulty standing or walking. The extent of your symptoms will depend on the type of fracture and its severity. A stress fracture, which is characterized by tiny cracks in the affected bone, may be less painful than a full fracture, in which a bone breaks completely. If you suspect that you may have a broken bone in your foot, please seek the care of a podiatrist.

A broken foot requires immediate medical attention and treatment. If you need your feet checked, contact Elliot T. Udell, DPM from New York. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Broken Foot Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

A broken foot is caused by one of the bones in the foot typically breaking when bended, crushed, or stretched beyond its natural capabilities. Usually the location of the fracture indicates how the break occurred, whether it was through an object, fall, or any other type of injury. 

Common Symptoms of Broken Feet:

  • Bruising
  • Pain
  • Redness
  • Swelling
  • Blue in color
  • Numbness
  • Cold
  • Misshapen
  • Cuts
  • Deformities

Those that suspect they have a broken foot shoot seek urgent medical attention where a medical professional could diagnose the severity.

Treatment for broken bones varies depending on the cause, severity and location. Some will require the use of splints, casts or crutches while others could even involve surgery to repair the broken bones. Personal care includes the use of ice and keeping the foot stabilized and elevated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Hicksville, NY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment for a Broken Foot
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Monday, 17 May 2021 00:00

Types of Peripheral Artery Disease

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a condition characterized by reduced blood flow to the lower limbs. This can cause symptoms such as leg cramps, pain, fatigue, numbness, skin discoloration, and foot wounds. There are two types of PAD. Occlusive PAD occurs when the blood vessels are blocked. This can be caused by the arteries thickening and hardening over time (atherosclerosis), an excess buildup of lymph fluid (lymphedema), blood clots forming in the veins of the leg muscles (deep vein thrombosis), or narrowed carotid arteries (carotid artery stenosis). Functional PAD occurs when the blood vessels are not blocked, but rather malfunctioning due to spasms. This can be seen in cases of varicose veins, Raynaud’s disease, and chronic venous insufficiency. Functional PAD is typically made worse or triggered by environmental or lifestyle factors, such as exposure to cold, excessive stress, and smoking. If you are experiencing any symptoms of PAD, it is suggested that you see a podiatrist.

Poor circulation is a serious condition and needs immediate medical attention. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact Elliot T. Udell, DPM of New York. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs is can be caused by peripheral artery disease (PAD), which is the result of a buildup of plaque in the arteries.

Plaque buildup or atherosclerosis results from excess calcium and cholesterol in the bloodstream. This can restrict the amount of blood which can flow through the arteries. Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs are sometimes caused by inflammation in the blood vessels, known as vasculitis.

Causes

Lack of oxygen and oxygen from poor blood circulation restricts muscle growth and development. It can also cause:

  • Muscle pain, stiffness, or weakness   
  • Numbness or cramping in the legs 
  • Skin discoloration
  • Slower nail & hair growth
  • Erectile dysfunction

Those who have diabetes or smoke are at greatest risk for poor circulation, as are those who are over 50. If you have poor circulation in the feet and legs it may be caused by PAD and is important to make changes to your lifestyle in order to reduce risk of getting a heart attack or stroke. Exercise and maintaining a healthy lifestyle will dramatically improve conditions.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Hicksville, NY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment of Poor Blood Circulation in the Feet
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Have you noticed a bony protrusion on the side of your big toe? If so, you may have developed the foot condition known as a bunion. Don't let bunions interfere with your daily activities.

Published in Blog
Monday, 10 May 2021 00:00

Potential Sources of Heel Pain

Heel pain can be debilitating, and it can develop due to a variety of causes. While it is most common among seniors, heel pain can occur at any age. The most common cause of heel pain is plantar fasciitis. This occurs when the plantar fascia, the tissues that connect the heel to the toes along the bottom of the foot, becomes inflamed. This causes the tissues to pull on and ultimately stress the heel. Plantar fasciitis can also lead to heel spurs. These occur when there are calcium deposits on the bottom of the heel bone that protrude out. Another common cause of heel pain is atrophy of the fat pad on the heel. Children, especially if they are active, who are suffering from heel pain may have Sever’s disease. This occurs when the bones in the calves grow faster than the Achilles tendon, which connects the heel bone to the calf muscle. If you are suffering from heel pain that won’t subside, consult with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and treatment method. 

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact Elliot T. Udell, DPM of New York. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact our office located in Hicksville, NY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a condition in which the arteries that supply blood to your limbs become narrow and hardened due to a buildup of plaque along the artery walls, leading to poor circulation. This condition is unfortunately quite common, affecting up to 200 million people worldwide. Often, people are not even aware that they have PAD because it does not always produce noticeable symptoms. When symptoms are apparent, they may include pain, cramping, tightness, or fatigue in the lower limbs. These symptoms often become worse with exercise or physical exertion. More advanced PAD can cause pain in the legs even without physical activity, as well as numbness, coldness, and discoloration of the lower limbs. In some cases, wounds that heal poorly may appear on the feet and legs. If you are experiencing any of the symptoms of PAD, or if you are older and at risk of developing this condition, please seek the care of a podiatrist.

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Elliot T. Udell, DPM from New York. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Hicksville, NY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Peripheral Artery Disease
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